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Last Updated: Feb 21, 2016 URL: http://libguides.anchoragelibrary.org/anchoragereads2016 Print Guide RSS Updates
2016 Print Page
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Anchorage Reads Calendar of Events

ANCHORAGE READS 2016 FLYER

Tuesday, February 9, 10am

TALK OF ALASKA - APRN Radio Broadcast
'Understanding Culture through Alaska Literature'
Host Lori Townsend with author Ernestine Hayes & guests

Author Talk with Ernestine Hayes
Thursday, Feburary 11, 7-9pm
ZJ Loussac Library
3600 Denali St.
Innovation Lab, 4th floor

Loussac 'Blonde Indian' Book Discussion
Saturday, February 20, 3-5pm
ZJ Loussac Library
3600 Denali St.
Alden Todd Boardroom, 4th floor

Email or Drop-off your Recipes for the '
Spam & Pilot Bread Cooking Challenge' by Sat., February 20, 6pm

Tuesday, February 23, 7pm
'Negotiating Identity in the U.S.' Panel Discussion CANCELLED

'Healing Through Storytelling Workshop'
with Vera Starbard
Saturday, February 27, 1-3pm
Sears Mall - Anchorage Library Space
700 E. Northern Lights Blvd


Community Celebration
and Wrap Party

Judging for Spam/Pilot Bread Cooking Challenge
Sunday, February 28, 2-5pm
Mountain View Branch Library
120 Bragaw St., Community Room




Alaska Reads Events Poster

Alaska Reads - Ms. Hayes Travel Schedule


January 31
—Ketchikan
February 1 — Petersburg
February 3 — Haines
February 4  — Skagway
February 7-13  — Anchorage and the Mat-Su Valley
February 15-16  — Nome
February 17 Kenai
February 18  — Ninilchik
February 19-20  — Homer
February 21-23  — Fairbanks
February 24-25Barrow
February 27  — Seward
February 28-29  — Sitka

      

    2016 Anchorage Reads, in cooperation with Alaska Reads

    2016 Alaska Reads | Alaska Center for the Book links

    2016 Anchorage Reads Readers' Guide PRINTABLE


    Request Hold for Blonde Indian book


    Request Hold for Blonde Indian Book Club Bag

    "What's in a BCB kit?"
    Book Club Bag kit [BCB] contains:

       •8-10 paperback copies, labeled & numbered
       •brief author biography
       •book club tips & general discussion questions

     

    More Memoirs & Biographies by Alaskan Native Authors

    Cover Art
    Through the Storm Towards the Sun - Carol Feller Brady
    Call Number: N-B BRADY-C BRADY
    ISBN: 9781420862140
    Publication Date: 2006-06-01

    Cover Art
    Attu Boy - Brenda Maly (Preface by); Nick Golodoff; Rachel Mason (Editor)
    Call Number: N-B GOLOD-N GOLODOF
    ISBN: 9781602232495
    Publication Date: 2015-05-15

    Cover Art
    Fifty Miles from Tomorrow - William L. Iggiagruk Hensley
    Call Number: N-B HENSL-W HENSLEY
    ISBN: 9780312429362
    Publication Date: 2010-03-02

    Cover Art
    Shadows on the Koyukuk - Sidney Huntington; Jim Reardon (Translator)
    Call Number: N-B HUNTI-S HUNTING
    ISBN: 9780882404271
    Publication Date: 1993-04-01

    Cover Art
    Alaska's Daughter - Elizabeth Bernhardt Pinson
    Call Number: N-B PINSO-E PINSON
    ISBN: 9780874215960
    Publication Date: 2005-01-01

    Cover Art
    Raising Ourselves - Velma Wallis
    Call Number: N-B WALLI-V WALLIS
    ISBN: 9780970849304
    Publication Date: 2002-09-01

    Cover Art
    Cold River Spirits - Jan Harper-Haines
    Call Number: N 979.8604 HARPER
    ISBN: 9780945397854
    Publication Date: 2000-04-01

    LAST WEEK! February 27th and 28th Events

     

    The Book - Blonde Indian: An Alaska Native Memoir

    Welcome to Anchorage Reads 2016 - February 1-29, 2016.
    Anyone can participate. Pick up a copy of the book at your local library or bookstore and get reading! 


         A fresh and compelling voice who has earned recognition in Native oratory and storytelling, Ernestine Hayes’s writing has appeared in Travelers’ Tales Alaska, The Anchorage Press, and the Juneau Empire. In Blonde Indian—a beautiful evocation of the enduring power of heritage and landscape through generations—Hayes traces her life through richly textured vivid dialogue. Drawing on the special relationship that the Native people of southeastern Alaska have always had with nature, Blonde Indian is a story about returning.

         Told in eloquent layers that blend native stories and metaphor with social and spiritual journeys, this groundbreaking memoir traces the author’s life from her childhood growing up in the Tlingit community through her adulthood, during which she lived for some time in Seattle and San Francisco, and eventually her return home. Neither fully Native American nor Euro-American, Hayes encounters a unique sense of alienation from both her Native community and the dominant culture. We witness her struggle alongside other Tlingit men and women—many of whom never left their Native community but wrestle with their own challenges, including unemployment, prejudice, alcoholism, and poverty.

         The author’s personal journey, the symbolic stories of contemporary Natives, and the tales and legends that have circulated among the Tlingit people for centuries are all woven together, making Blonde Indian much more than the story of one woman’s life. Filled with anecdotes, descriptions, and histories that are unique to the Tlingit community, this book is a document of cultural heritage, a tribute to the Alaskan landscape, and a moving testament to how going back—in nature and in life—allows movement forward.

         Ernestine Hayes is an assistant professor of English at the University of Alaska Southeast. She received the Fiction Writer’s Award from the Anchorage Daily News and the Explorations Alaska Native Writers Award in 2002.

    Courtesy of the University of Arizona Press, Tucson, AZ

       

      The Author - Ernestine Hayes

           Ernestine Hayes was born to the Tlingit Kaagwaantaan clan at the end of World War II. Her work has appeared in Studies in American Indian Literature, Tipton Poetry Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, Cambridge History of Western American Literature, and other publications.

           In Blonde Indian, an Alaska Native Memoir, she weaves reminiscences of her life, stories from her grandmother, Tlingit history, nature writing, and fiction into a testament of the twentieth-century Alaska Native experience and a love song to the land. Her memoir received an American Book Award and an Honoring Alaska Indigenous Literature award, was named a Native America Calling Book of the Month, and was a finalist for the 2007 Kiriyama Prize and the 2007 PEN Non-fiction Award.

           In 2015, Hayes was recognized as a 2015 AWARE Woman of Distinction for her work in the Juneau community and was the recipient of an Alaska Literary Award and a Rasmuson Artists in Residence award, which enabled her to complete her next work, The Tao of Raven, an Alaska Native Memoir, scheduled for publication in Fall 2016 by the University of Washington Press.

           Ms. Hayes makes her home in Juneau, Alaska, near the Juneau Indian Village where she was born. 

      Courtesy
      of the Alaska Center for the Book, Anchorage, AK.

        Synopsis and Discussion Questions

        SYNOPSIS

             In the spring, the bear returns to the forest, the glacier returns to its source, and the salmon returns to the fresh water where it was spawned. Drawing on the special relationship that the Native people of southeastern Alaska have always had with nature, Blonde Indian is a story about returning.

              Told in eloquent layers that blend Native stories and metaphor with social and spiritual journeys, this enchanting memoir traces the author’s life from her difficult childhood growing up in the Tlingit community, through her adulthood, during which she lived for some time in Seattle and San Francisco and, eventually, to her return home. Of both Tlingit and European heritage, Hayes encounters a unique sense of alienation from both cultures.

              The author’s personal journey, the symbolic stories of contemporary Natives, and the tales and legends that have circulated among the Tlingit people for centuries are all woven together, making Blonde Indian much more than the story of one woman’s life. Filled with anecdotes, descriptions, and histories that are unique to the Tlingit community, this book is a document of cultural heritage, a tribute to the Alaskan landscape, and a moving testament to how going back—in nature and in life—allows movement forward. What experiences have you had living in a culture not your own?


        STUDY QUESTIONS

        • Think about how the author continually refers to traditional foods. How does food relate to your own traditions and experiences?

        • If you were exiled from your homeland, what would you take with you?

        • How would you pass important parts of your culture on to your grandchildren?

        • Hayes uses land as metaphor for the Alaska Native experience. In what ways is this metaphor extended by descriptions of food, from childhood hunting and gathering activities to the growing emotional and physical distance from the food traditionally gathered from the land?

        • “I was finally broke. I was finally forty. I would go home now, or I would die with my thoughts facing north.” (pg 111) How far would you have to fall to run toward home instead of away from home?

        • Is it enough to just “show up in the world and say Here I am”? (pg 121)
          Courtesy of the Alaska Center for the Book, Anchorage, AK.

          For more discussion questions go to: http://www.alaskacenterforthebook.org/alaska-reads-2016/

            

          Media Links & Reviews


          Ernestine Hayes Fall 2015 Craft Lecture "Elements of Creative Writing in Oral Tradition" on Vimeo
          .


          "One of the most important books to come out of Alaska. There have been
          other great memoirs by Alaska Natives, but few if any have been made
          with such disarming humor, such bravery and such warmth."

          ~ The Anchorage Press ~


          "This sometimes raw, consistently honest memoir is a rewarding, evocative,
          ultimately uplifting view of Native life."

          ~ Deborah Donovan, Booklist ~


              

            About Anchorage Reads

            Anchorage Reads 2007-2016
               
            Anchorage Reads is a month long celebration of literature where the Anchorage community can engage with each other by sharing one book, one read.  This year Anchorage Reads is part of the first state wide community program, Alaska Reads. Check the 'Calendar of Events' (left column) for local and statewide events from February 1-29th.

            2016 Alaska/Anchorage Reads Finalists:
                                                         
            Blonde Indian by Ernestine Hayes
                                                         Cold Storage by John Straley 
                                                         Ordinary Wolves by Seth Kantner 
                                                         The Creatures at the Absolute Bottom of the Sea by Rosemary McGuire 
                                                         Two Old Women by Velma Wallace
                                                                 

            2015 The Raven’s Gift  by Don Rearden 2010 Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
            2014 The Influencing Machine: Brooke Gladstone on the Media by Brooke Gladstone 2009 The Trap by John Smelcer
            2013 The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey 2008 To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
            2012 The Complete Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi 2007 Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
            2011 The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

                                                          
            Thank You to Anchorage Reads Partners and Sponsors!
            WE greatly appreciate the generosity and commitment of past and present sponsors and community partners. 

                             

                
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